Pledge

Parents - Pledge Your Support

Parents Who Host Lose the Most is a nationwide, non-profit charitable organization founded in 1987 whose mission is to lead the way in promoting healthy lives through the prevention of substance abuse and related problems. While the organization was originally developed in Ohio, it has now been embraced throughout  the country.  Specifically, St. Croix County is working with local organizations like Hudson SAFE to increase public awareness of substance abuse and to help develop programs to keep our youth safe and drug free.  For more information , please visit the website drugfreeactionalliance.org. Source: www.drugfreeactionalliance.org

Hudson SAFE is asking all Hudson High School parents to consider signing the pledge below with our goal being to establish a list of parents who are committed to keeping our young adults alcohol and drug free. The directory can be accessed and utilized to see the other parents who are committed to these values.

 

Pledge

I pledge to encourage youth to be substance-free by:

  • Hosting only alcohol, tobacco and other drug-free parties for them
  • Not allowing my child(ren) or their friends to possess or consume alcohol, tobacco and other drugs on my property
  • Discouraging my child(ren) from attending unsupervised parties

I agree to allow my name to be posted or printed in connection with any publicity regarding the pledge.

Protect your children by following these guidelines when hosting teen parties:

  • Host safe, alcohol-free activities and events for youth
  • Refuse to supply alcohol to children or allow drinking in your home or on your property
  • Be at home when your teenager has a party
  • Make sure your teenager’s friends do not bring alcohol into your home
  • Talk to other parents about not providing alcohol at youth events



 

Know the Rules…Understand the Consequences

Wisconsin Underage Drinking Laws

  • As a parent, you cannot give alcohol to your teen’s friends under the age of 21 under any circumstances, even in your own home, even with their parent’s permission.
  • You cannot knowingly allow a person under 21, other than your own child, to remain in your home or on your property while consuming or possessing alcohol.

If a parent breaks the Wisconsin law

  • You can face fines from $300-$1,000 per underage person served, 30 days to 9 months in jail, and/or community service.
  • If you give alcohol to anyone under 21 and they, in turn, hurt someone, hurt themselves or damage property, you can be held liable and sued in civil court and may also face criminal charges for serious injuries or property damage.

 


 

Know the Facts

Parents play a major role in their children’s choices about alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. A recent national survey of parents and teens by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University found one-third of teen partygoers have been to parties where teens were drinking alcohol, smoking marijuana, or using cocaine, ecstasy or prescription drugs while a parent was present. By age 17, nearly half (46%) of teens have been at such parties where parents were present. As a parent, you cannot give alcohol to your teen’s friends under the age of 21 under any circumstance, even in your own home,

even with their parent’s permission. You also cannot knowingly allow a person under 21, other than your own child, to remain in your home or on your property while consuming or possessing alcohol. There are legal consequences if you do. Simply taking away the car keys does not solve all the problems related to underage drinking. Every day, at least six youth under 21 die from non-driving alcohol-related causes, such as drowning and suicide. Delinquent behaviors also increase with underage drinking.

You can protect your children by following these guidelines when hosting teen parties:

  • Host safe, alcohol-free activities and events for youth
  • Refuse to supply alcohol to youth or allow drinking in your home or on your property
  • Be at home when your teenager has a party
  • Make sure your teenager’s friends do not bring alcohol into your home
  • Talk to other parents about not providing alcohol at youth events
  • Report underage drinking

Our youth deserve to live and grow to adulthood in an environment where alcohol is not misused. Let’s be unified in our message, and host alcohol-free parties with plenty of fun activities to show our youth that we care about their future. More information about the Parents Who Host, Lost the Most: Don’t be a party to teenage drinking campaign and Drug-Free Action Alliance is available at: www.drugfreeactionalliance.org. Source: www.drugfreeactionalliance.org

 

Parent Party Tips: If your teen is giving a party:

  • Help your teenager plan the party. Make a guest list and invite only a specific number of people.
  • Have your child pass out or send invitations and try to avoid the “open party” situation.
  • Don’t send e-mail invitations. They can be forwarded to a large number of people quickly and you lose control of who has this information.
  • Put your phone number on the invitation and welcome calls from parents.
  • Set rules ahead of time such as no alcohol, tobacco or other drugs. Set a start and end time for the party.
  • Let attendees know that if they leave, they can’t come back.
  • Have plenty of food and non-alcoholic beverages.
  • Plan some activities such as music, games, movies, etc.
  • Let your neighbors know in advance there will be a party and that you will be there to supervise.
  • Familiarize yourself with your community’s noise ordinance.
  • Limit the party access to a certain area of the house/property.
  • Have a plan for dealing with vehicles. Include parking information on your party invitation.
  • Call parents of any teen who arrives in possession of alcohol or under the influence. If you can’t get in touch with the parents, keep the teen there or call the police if necessary. You can be civilly liable if you know they have been drinking and you let them leave.
  • Secure all forms of alcohol, firearms and other potentially hazardous items in your home in a safe place.
  • Make regular and unobtrusive visits to the party area with sensitivity to teens’ needs for privacy and independence.
  • Invite some other parents to help chaperone if there will be a large number of teenagers.

Source: www.drugfreeactionalliance.org

 

Other Resources
Photograph Courtesy Hudson Star Observer